A Different Look at Discipline

by admin on July 28, 2011

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #6

by admin on July 22, 2011

Is positive child guidance research based?

When the system isn’t working:

  • In a recent report “Reducing Behavior Problems in the Elementary Classroom,” by the Institute of Education Sciences: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (2008), the authors reported that an “estimated one-third of students fail to learn because of psychosocial problems that interfere with their ability to fully attend to and engage in instructional activities, prompting a call for ‘new directions for addressing barriers to learning” (Adelman and Taylor, 2005, p. 5).
  • In a review of the research, authors Osher, Bear, Sprague, and Doyle (2010) noted that “punitive approaches to discipline have been linked to antisocial behavior” (p. 48).

There is a better way:

  • Based on the above review, the authors proposed an “ecological approach” that focused teachers’ attention on creating a positive  environment that promoted “cooperation, engagement, and motivation rather than compliance, control, and coercion” (p. 49).  It was generally concluded that “well managed classrooms support academic achievement and … the ecological framework has been associated with success” (p. 49).
  • “Research also supports the importance of …supportive relations between teachers and students, as well as developing positive peer relationships. Under such conditions, students are more likely to internalize school values, exhibit on-task behavior, exhibit less oppositional and antisocial behavior, and have fewer conflicts with teachers and peers.  Social supports and relationships are particularly important for children at greatest risk for school disengagement and problem behaviors (p. 51& 52).
  • Connectedness, a positive peer climate, safety, and authentic challenges are essential conditions for learning (p. 53).

The research is clear: “Effective teacher-student interactions CAN mitigate the achievement gap!”

  • The authors of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS), from the University of Virginia, devised an instrument that measures the emotional support, classroom organization, and instructional support of quality classrooms (www.class.teachstone.org

  • CLASS measures:
    • Climate
      • Teacher Sensitivity
      • Regard for Student Perspectives
      • Behavior Management
      • Productivity
      • Instructional Learning Formats
      • Concept Development
      • Quality of Feedback
      • Language Modeling
      • Literacy Focus

  • The research conducted in over 3000 PK-3rd grade classrooms concluded that children in classrooms with higher CLASS ratings realized greater gains in academic achievement and positive social skill development.

  • Positive and supportive teacher-child interactions were the catalysts to creating positive and caring classrooms.

  • High levels of emotional support were associated with reading and math achievement from K-3rd grade.

  • Kindergartners experienced more social competencies, improved early literacy, and more self control.

  • Sadly, in a study of over 800 children, only 10% were enrolled in positive learning environments; children from low income families were less likely to experience positive teacher-student interactions.

Therefore, it is essential that we establish positive learning environments in all of our classrooms, if we want each child to perceive him/herself to be a competent and confident learner.

Positive child guidance is the first step towards academic success.

Reference

Osher, D, Bear, G., Sprague, J., and Doyle, W. (2010). How Can We Improve School Discipline? Educational

Researcher. AERA. 39 (1) p. 48-58.

(c) Dr. Lynn Staley

 

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #5

July 20, 2011

ShareSweet or Sour Relationships? The Sour 25: What Positive Child Guidance is NOT Ignoring me Breaking promises Yelling at me Interrupting me Treating me like I don’t matter Forgetting that I have feelings, too Assuming that I don’t care Misunderstanding that when I mess up it’s usually because I don’t know how to do it right […]

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #4

July 18, 2011

Share<h2>Are You Wearing 3D Glasses?</h2> Positive child guidance is not a curriculum guide or an add-on.  It is a philosophy that strives to understand children rather than punish them.  It is an attitude that embraces each and every child.  It is about creating a very personal and very unique connection with each child.  It is […]

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #3

July 16, 2011

ShareIf Punishment Doesn’t Teach, What Does? The character Junie B. Jones described the child’s perspective simply but accurately, “Punishment takes the friendly right out of you” (Parks, 1993). Punishment motivates behavior choices by using external consequences, while positive child guidance, motivates by an internal desire to do what is right. I like the way Dan […]

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #2

July 14, 2011

ShareDoes Punishment Teach? Sarah, a second grader, missed recess for not putting her name on her paper. John, a fifth grader, was in detention every day because his father would not sign his homework. Cameron, a fifth grader, had to sit in the hall everyday during reading for not paying attention. Does punishment teach? NO! […]

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Positive Classroom Behavior – Article #1

July 12, 2011

ShareWhat’s the difference between discipline and child guidance? Discipline literally means to teach; however, to many teachers, discipline means to punish. The problem is that punishment doesn’t transform attitudes and behaviors or produce lasting results. Punishment doesn’t create a caring community of learners. Rather than lunch detention, missing recess, or sitting in the hall, positive […]

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Positive Classroom Discipline Book Now on Amazon!

July 11, 2011

ShareWe are excited to report that we are now on Amazon. You can purchase our paperback or kindle version of Nurturing Positive Behaviors in Your Classroom right on Amazon.

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Professional Development for New Teachers: Positive Classroom Discipline #6

July 5, 2011

ShareThe Sweet 25: What Positive Child Guidance IS: 1. Paying attention to me (noticing my new shoes or my new haircut!) 2. Keeping promises and doing what you say you will do 3. Using a gentle voice with me 4. Letting me finish my sentence 5. Treating me like I am really important to you […]

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Professional Development for New Teachers: Positive Classroom Discipline #5

July 4, 2011

ShareThe Sour 25: What Positive Child Guidance is NOT 1. Ignoring me 2. Breaking promises 3. Yelling at me 4. Interrupting me 5. Treating me like I don’t matter 6. Forgetting that I have feelings, too 7. Assuming that I don’t care 8. Misunderstanding that when I mess up it’s usually because I don’t know […]

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